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Addressing family violence and sexual violence will significantly improve the wellbeing of all people in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Te Aorerekura is the National Strategy and Action Plan setting out a new collective path for government, tangata whenua, specialist sectors, and communities to eliminate family violence and sexual violence.

Watch the Launch of Te Aorerekura: National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence. Tuesday 7 December, 2021.

Download the National Strategy and Action Plan

Translations

View other translated versions of the National Strategy and Action Plan:

National Strategy

Action Plan on a page

Samoan translation: Te Aorerekura [PDF, 2 MB]

Tongan translation: Te Aorerekura [PDF, 2.1 MB]

Hindi translation: Te Aorerekura [PDF, 2.3 MB]

Mandarin translation: Te Aorerekura [PDF, 2.9 MB]

Samoan translation: Actions on a page [PDF, 105 KB]

Tongan translation: Actions on a page [PDF, 109 KB]

Hindi translation: Actions on a page [PDF, 134 KB]

Mandarin translation: Actions on a page [PDF, 368 KB]

 Alternate formats of the National Strategy:

NZSL: Te Aorerekura National Strategy to Stop Family Violence and Sexual Violence

Moemoeā – Dream and vision

Moemoeā: All people in Aotearoa New Zealand are thriving; their wellbeing is enhanced and sustained because they are safe and supported to live their lives free from family violence and sexual violence.All people in Aotearoa New Zealand are thriving; their wellbeing is enhanced and sustained because they are safe and supported to live their lives free from family violence and sexual violence.

This Moemoeā or dream was created with tangata whenua, specialist sectors, and communities.

At the heart of this Moemoeā is ora – meaning to be well and thriving, to have mana enhanced and restored, to experience safety in all parts of life. Mana and ora are important parts of a person’s wellbeing, relationships and connections.

6 shifts for change

Te Aorerekura outlines 6 key changes or 'shifts' to eliminate family violence and sexual violence in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Each of the shifts in this Strategy are interconnected, and the depend on the wider changes across Aotearoa that will help address the drivers of violence.

The Action Plan outlines the specific actions government agencies and communities will carry out to achieve these shifts:

  • Shift 1: Towards strength-based wellbeing
  • Shift 2: Towards mobilising communities
  • Shift 3: Towards skilled, culturally competent and sustainable workforces
  • Shift 4: Towards investment in primary prevention to protect against family violence and sexual violence
  • Shift 5: Towards, safe, accessible and integrated responses
  • Shift 6: Towards increased capacity for healing
  • Learning and monitoring progress.

Whanonga pono – guiding principles

The Whanonga pono – guiding principles – help shape the way every person and organisation works as part of Te Aorerekura, and how to implement it.

  • Prioritising equity and inclusion in all spaces
  • Acting with aroha
  • All actions are tika and pono, where people act with fairness, integrity, and are accountable for their actions
  • People work together in an integrated way, reflecting kotahitanga
  • People practise kaitiakitanga – people understand their roles and responsibilities to ensure the safety and wellbeing of people and their families and whanau.

Building a National Strategy

Te Aorerekura builds on the significant work and investment already underway in government and communities to eliminate family violence and sexual violence and explains the need for a collaborative approach to do this. It acknowledges the need to rebalance efforts towards prevention in order to support intergenerational change.

Te Aorerekura also builds on reports and research from the last 20 years to provide insights on the changes required to prevent and eliminate family violence and sexual violence.

In 2015, it was estimated that the government spends more than $1.4 billion annually(external link) on the consequences of family violence and sexual violence. That number is now estimated to be between $1.5-2 billion. More than $200 million invested over the last four years has given the family violence and sexual violence sectors more funding for services, supported by a joint approach to investment and planning.

Te Aorerekura establishes a shared view of where we have got to, what needs to be done differently, what more is required to eliminate family violence and sexual violence, and how tangata whenua, government, communities and sectors can work together to make this happen.

Learn about our progress on implementing Te Aorerekura.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi and te ao Māori values

Te Aorerekura draws on Te Tiriti o Waitangi, mātauranga Māori and te ao Māori values to envision a different expectation of how to achieve safety and wellbeing for all people in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Te Aorerekura incorporates these Te Tiriti o Waitangi approaches:

  • Article one - Kawanatanga – continuing to build relationships and partnering with iwi and Māori organisations in the delivery and governance of Te Aorerekura.
  • Article two - Tino Rangatiratanga – enabling iwi, hapū, whānau, and Māori communities to have full authority (mana motuhake) over their own wellbeing.
  • Article three - Oritetanga – working with tangata whenua to strengthen protective factors and achieve equitable outcomes that allow iwi, hapū, whānau, and Māori communities to realise their potential, free of family violence and sexual violence.

An ao Māori focus seeks to be inclusive of all perspectives. Māori and Pacific peoples share a special relationship or va. They are connected by whakapapa with kinship through commonalities of history, culture, oral traditions of origins. Wairuatanga is emerging as something to be considered alongside Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Wairuatanga enables iwi, hapū, whānau and Māori communities to practice ritenga (customs) framed by te ao Māori, enacted through tikanga Māori and encapsulated within mātauranga Māori.

Engagement for Te Aorerekura

To develop Te Aorerekura, we undertook extensive public engagement from May-June 2021. This resulted in:

Hear the voices of our communities share their thoughts on Te Aorerekura.

What we understood: summaries of 2020 engagement

To share the voices we heard during our engagement process, the Joint Venture produced summaries that outline key themes in the feedback we received.

The summaries below reflect careful analysis of the common themes emerging from the many different engagements. These summaries were assessed by the Joint Venture and reviewed by our Independent Advisors to make sure they accurately reflect the opinions of the people who spoke to us.

PDF

Word document

Summary 1, 12-19 May 2021 [PDF, 302 KB]

Word: Summary 1, 12-19 May 2021 [DOCX, 83 KB]

Summary 2, 19 May - 8 June 2021 [PDF, 366 KB]

Word: Summary 2, 19 May - 8 June 2021 [DOCX, 91 KB]

Summary 3, 9-30 June 2021 [PDF, 416 KB]

Word: Summary 3, 9-30 June 2021 [DOCX, 110 KB]

Summary 4, Final submissions 30 June 2021 [PDF, 449 KB]

Word: Summary 4, 30 June 2021 [DOCX, 114 KB]

View other key documents we used to invite people to contribute to our engagement process for Te Aorerekura.

Easy Read versions

Alternate formats

Have your say Easy Read - PDF [PDF, 3.2 MB]

Have your say Easy Read - Word [DOCX, 7.5 MB]

NZ Sign Language video (6:33 minutes)(external link)

Listen to the audio file (21:42 minutes) [MP3, 5.6 MB]

See the large print version [DOCX, 85 KB]

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